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My jaw has dropped

My poker face is usually pretty top notch, however this arts bizzo isn’t about being thick skinned, its almost about wearing your heart on your sleeve. but how do we get so brave to be so outwardly honest? and how do we back our work to the fullest while remaining this honest to ourselves?

This is a delima i have faced as long as i remember.

though perhaps not a full answer, this exceptional blog has provided me with a earning to  be more open about what i am creating, or even thinking of creating. It has contained two of the most profoundly powerful things I have ever read in relation to success in music

I think you should read it too. I think you will like it. I know it’s hard to make the change from random practicing to a structured methodical schedule.

I wish I had read this a few years ago to be truly honest. Here’s the best bit (its actually all of it, I don’t care you need to see this)

http://musiciansway.com/blog/2013/05/the-power-of-a-practice-schedule/

“Consistent, deep practice is the rocket fuel of musical development.

When we live by regular practice schedules we reap countless benefits.

Here are 6 major ones.

1. Insight
Our devotion to practice sharpens our artistic insight because our creative faculties get ongoing exercise.

2. Energy
During the periods between practice sessions, we know when we’ll practice next, which helps us keep our musical goals in mind, adding to our creative energy.

3. Pacing
when we know that specific times are set aside for practice, we can better pace our learning.

4. Productivity
Consistent practice enables us to be maximally productive day after day.

5. Motivation
The productivity we gain bolsters our success and amplifies our motivation to work.

6. Balance
because we carve out periods to practice, we can also set aside time for self-care, relationships, career development, and more. As a result, we grow as artists, and we live balanced lives in the process.”

It’s so curious that the excuses to not practise are the same as the rewards of practising. I strongly recommend adopting a practise schedule, let it grow and change as you do.

The other article that captured my attention was this one about creating value in society.

http://musiciansway.com/blog/2013/06/the-secret-to-sustainable-music-careers/

Again, I really don’t care that its copied you do need to see it.

“Creating Value – An Exercise
If you’re unsure how you might multiply the value of your work, here’s an exercise I use to help musicians:

  • List 3 or more ways you might build new audiences for your current work
    (e.g., perform or teach in unconventional venues; contact presenters outside of your comfort zone)
  • List 3 or more ways you might adapt your current work to appeal to new audiences
    (devise concert programs geared to niche audiences; explore new sorts of collaborations)
  • List 3 or more new skills you might develop that would enable you to expand your audience
    (investigate new styles; acquire the ability to teach and perform for different age groups; learn to do online marketing)
  • List 3 or more people you might consult for advice on how you could create greater value
    (former teachers; current colleagues; established pros)”

I’m presently working on this exercise and I encourage you all to as well.

The aspect of this that “made my jaw drop” was the fact that the author doesn’t once mention cash. Value is represented by the people who share in your creative products. “We don’t “sell out” because lasting value in the arts arises from authentic creativity, not artificiality.”

value is therefore in the people my art touches, not in the money.

What is essence in me is essence in others, i know my work will have a value to the people of the world that feel and think the way i do, and i feel that this knowledge will help to keep me grounded throughout my journey.

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